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The Festival of Learning 2016 has ended, it took place June 6–9, 2016. This post-secondary education event hosted more than 400 delegates, offering a variety of session formats, learning experiences, unique spaces, as well as social and networking events. Don’t miss the next Festival of Learning 2018 happening May 28-30, 2018.

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Scholarly Teaching & Learning Strand Session (Open to All) [clear filter]
Monday, June 6
 

9:00am PDT

Engaging Technology Learners Through Gamification: Making Learning Stick! (9:00- 9:50 Area 3B)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 50 Participants (First-Come, First-In). This session is held in a large ballroom with two sessions happening at opposite ends of the room. (Area 3B)

In today’s intensive technical programs, learning is more than ‘remembering’ and ‘recalling’ facts and processes, but generating collaborative approaches within team settings to assimilate knowledge and infer solution to problems.

The Biomedical Engineering Technology program at BCIT is a two-year intensive journey in the life of young men and women aspiring to take charge of one of the most critical functions: making sure that medical equipments are fully operational at all times. 

In an attempt to support student learning through better engagement in of one of our courses (BMET 2200) with considerable technical content, the ‘Pass the Problem’ game was employed during the very first session.

Based on this experience and feedback gathered from students, our session will address the pros and cons of using gamification to assist students develop thinking skills around technical topics. Participants will also practice the ‘Pass the Problem’ game themselves to evaluate its impact on learning.

Presenters
Edmond Zahedi, Faculty Member, British Columbia Institute of Technology
Cathy Griffin, Instructional Development Consultant, Learning and Teaching Centre, British Columbia Institute of Technology

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Griffin

Cathy Griffin

Instructional Development Consultant, Learning and Teaching Centre, British Columbia Institute of Technology
BCIT
avatar for Edmond Zahedi

Edmond Zahedi

Faculty Member, British Columbia Institute of Technology
I am passionate about finding the most efficient ways of conveying technical information. Through the 25+ years of teaching at various academic levels, I have experienced different methods, and still enjoy adapting myself to the challenges of higher education.


Monday June 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:50am PDT
Grand Villa 3 Ballroom (Second Floor)

9:00am PDT

Reflections on the Applied Teaching Workshop: An ISW adaptation for Chinese Vocational Education Administrators (9:00 - 9:50 - Area 3A)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 50 Participants (First-Come, First-In). This session is held in a large ballroom with two sessions happening at opposite ends of the room. (Area 3A)

In autumn of 2015, 16 senior administrators from China with responsibility for vocational education visited BCIT to learn more about the teaching of applied skills in Canada. Three BCIT Instructional Development Consultants (Loretta Teng, Youdan Zhang and Mary Wilson) designed and co-facilitated a four-day Applied Teaching Workshop for them. As experienced Instructional Skills Workshop facilitators, we designed a single-mini-lesson version of the ISW, with an expanded focus on the principles of learner-centred instruction and educational philosophy.

We think this Applied Teaching Workshop format could be effective for administrators (deans, directors, etc.) in post-secondary education and for Human Resources personnel who provide feedback to staff or trainees. We would like to engage those attending our session in a round-table discussion exploring ideas for adapting the ISW for educational administrators (from Canada or elsewhere) and for other educational/learning situations.


Presenters
Mary Wilson, Instructional Development Consultant, Learning and Teaching Centre, British Columbia Institute of Technology
Youdan Zhang, Instructional Development Consultant, Learning and Teaching Centre, British Columbia Institute of Technology 

Speakers
avatar for Mary Wilson

Mary Wilson

Instructional Development Consultant, BCIT
I'm currently a half-time Instructional Development Consultant (IDC) at BCIT, mostly working with instructors as they prepare courses for online delivery. I'm also an Open Learning Faculty Member at Thompson Rivers University. I teach in the graduate certificate program, Online Teaching... Read More →
YZ

Youdan Zhang

Instructional Development Consultant, Learning and Teaching Centre, British Columbia Institute of Technology
BCIT


Monday June 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:50am PDT
Grand Villa 3 Ballroom (Second Floor)

10:00am PDT

The Effect of Using Mobile Classroom Response System on Students’ Engagement and Performance (10:00 - 10:30 Area 3A)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 50 Participants (First-Come, First-In). This session is held in a large ballroom with two sessions happening at opposite ends of the room. (Area 3A)

Classroom response systems promote learning in small and large classes and in both lecture and lab settings. In the last decade, the rapid proliferation of smart devices has presented an opportunity to develop new interactive mobile classroom response systems (MCRSs) which have the potential to enhance students’ learning experience.

This talk will summarise an on-going research conducted at Kwantlen Polytechnic University aiming to assess the impacts of using an MCRS on students’ engagement and performance in lab science classes.

Preliminary findings are suggesting that the use of an MCRS makes classes more engaging, improves the amount of interaction between instructor and students, improves student’s understanding of how well s/he comprehends the lecture content, enhances students’ learning, creates a better learning experience, and does not distract students from focusing on class concepts.  


Presenter
Khaled Hamdan, Instructor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
 

Speakers
avatar for Khaled Hamden

Khaled Hamden

Instructor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
How to Use Cell Phones as Learning Tools!


Monday June 6, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am PDT
Grand Villa 3 Ballroom (Second Floor)

10:00am PDT

Using a Classroom-based Research Project to Engage Students in an Introductory Ecology Course (10:00 -10:30 Area 3B)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 50 Participants (First-Come, First-In). This session is held in a large ballroom with two sessions happening at opposite ends of the room. (Area 3B)

Introductory ecology students at the University of the Fraser Valley have been engaging in a long-term field study on the decomposition of leaf litter packs in streams to gain an appreciation of ecological principles and methods of ecological research.  Throughout a semester, students study the decomposition of leaves, measure water quality, and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates at an assigned stream site. Students are then provided with the opportunity to test hypotheses using data collected by the class.  The impact of the stream study on student engagement and learning of ecological principles was assessed in the fall of 2015 using a Student Assessment of Learning Gains survey instrument (SALG) and a subset of questions from the Questions for Biology (Q4B).  The results of the assessment of student learning and the utility of the assessment procedures will be examined.  

Presenters
Alida Janmaat, Assistant Professor, University of the Fraser Valley

Speakers
AJ

Alida Janmaat

Associate Professor, University of the Fraser Valley
Active learning in biology lectures. How to develop and implement a classroom undergraduate research experience.


Monday June 6, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am PDT
Grand Villa 3 Ballroom (Second Floor)

11:00am PDT

Improving Learning Outcomes in Remote Learning Communities (11:00 - 11:50 Area 3B)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 50 Participants (First-Come, First-In). This session takes place in a large ballroom with two sessions happening at the same time but at opposite ends of the room. (Area 3B)


Mary-Anne Neal is working closely with the Sahtu Dene communities of Fort Good Hope and Colville Lake to reimagine the education system in an effort to improve learning outcomes, raise academic standards, build leadership capacity and promote lifelong learning. 

Her recent visit to the Northwest Territories marks the first step in a long-term initiative that will engage learners of all ages in personal and community improvement projects. 

Barriers to success faced by Canada’s aboriginal population are already well documented. In this presentation, Mary-Anne will share the ways by which incorporating the principles of 21st Century Learning will support achievement of the goals set by the Dene people.


Presenter 
Mary-Anne Neal, Associate Faculty, Royal Roads University 

Speakers
avatar for Mary-Anne Neal

Mary-Anne Neal

Associate Faculty, Royal Roads University
I work to improve educational outcomes for indigenous learners who live in remote northern communities.My specialization is experiential learning and I want to learn more about incorporating activities into online instruction.



Monday June 6, 2016 11:00am - 11:50am PDT
Grand Villa 3 Ballroom (Second Floor)

11:00am PDT

Using Muddiest Point Formative Feedback to Encourage Reflective Teaching and Improve Student Learning (11:00 - 11:50)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 60 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

Teachers may frequently ask: How do I quickly capture what students know and what they don’t? This presentation introduces a formative feedback method, the muddiest point survey, used in engineering classes to facilitate reflective teaching. For instructors, the muddiest point survey helps them gain valuable insights into students’ learning and think deeply about their teaching; whereas for students, it encourages learning reflection on a regular basis. This method also creates a more consistent means for students to communicate their learning needs with instructors. Because the muddiest point data collection is done automatically through Blackboard, this process saves instructor’s time and makes the implementation of this method feasible for both large and small classes. This presentation will demonstrate how the muddiest point survey has both changed instructors’ perception towards more student-centered teaching, and improved overall student learning.

Presenter
Claire Yan, Senior Instructor, University of British Columbia

Speakers
CY

Claire Yan

Senior Instructor, University of British Columbia
UBC


Monday June 6, 2016 11:00am - 11:50am PDT
Grand Villa 1 Ballroom (Second Floor)

11:00am PDT

Using Smart Devices as Mobile Classroom Response Systems (11:00 - 11:50 Area 3A)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 50 Participants (First-Come, First-In). This session is held in a large ballroom with two sessions happening at opposite ends of the room. (Area 3A)

In the last decade, the rapid proliferation of smart devices has presented an opportunity to develop new interactive mobile classroom response systems (MCRSs) which have the potential to enhance students’ learning experience. This session begins with presenting Kwantlen Polytechnic University student perceptions about using MCRSs.

It follows with a technical explanation and hands-on demonstration on how to use Reef Polling application to turn students’ smart devices into MCRSs for the purpose of creating an interactive learning environment.

Please prepare to participate in this session by downloading the free REEF Polling by i>clicker application from Apple Store (for iphones and ipads) or Play Store (Android devices). If you do not have a smart device then you can still participate using a PC browser. You need to bring a PC to download the instructor’s software and to set up a polling session for one of your classes.   


Presenter
Khaled Hamdan, Instructor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Speakers
avatar for Khaled Hamden

Khaled Hamden

Instructor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
How to Use Cell Phones as Learning Tools!


Monday June 6, 2016 11:00am - 11:50am PDT
Grand Villa 3 Ballroom (Second Floor)

1:00pm PDT

Walking in the Past: Active Learning in Introductory Canadian History Classes (1:00 - 1:50 Area 3B)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 50 Participants (First-Come, First-In). This session is held in a large ballroom with one other session at the other end happening at the same time. (Area 3B)

The subject of history is one that continues to fascinate even in the 21st century, as the popularity of Youtube videos like “100 Years of Beauty” can attest. So why does history in university continue to be seen as dry and boring? Historians have been slow to adopt active learning techniques. Part of the problem lies in the lack of information available about the practicalities of developing and implementing these activities. My paper addresses the use of active learning in universities, with special attention to the subject of Canadian history. Using my experiences and research, I take participants through the development of one such activity – a digital walking tour – how I located primary sources, how I structured the activity around specific learning goals, and how I ran the activity in my classroom. I argue that these activities are effective tools for increasing student engagement with history at the university level. 

Presenter
Andrea Eidinger, Limited Term Instructor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University 

Speakers
AE

Andrea Eidinger

Limited Term Instructor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
KPU


Monday June 6, 2016 1:00pm - 1:50pm PDT
Grand Villa 3 Ballroom (Second Floor)

1:00pm PDT

What is Persuasive Evidence of Program Impact for Different Stakeholders? (1:00 - 1:50 Area 3A)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 50 Participants (First-Come, First-In). This session is held in a large ballroom with one other session at the other end happening at the same time. (Area 3A)

Since 2014, we have conducted an ongoing formal evaluation of a small grants program to support faculty teaching inquiry using multiple types of data (surveys, interviews, documents). Over 159 grants have been awarded, 112 are complete with final reports. Evaluation findings are used for different purposes including, to provide evidence of program impact and to continually improve the program. We have learned a lot about what types of information or data are interesting and persuasive to different stakeholders (e.g., central administration, Deans, faculty members) and how to most effectively present this information. We will share our strategies and provide examples of reports and presentations to different stakeholders. We will engage the audience in a conversation about this topic and entertain examples of other approaches.


Presenters
Cheryl Amundsen, Professor, Faculty of Education; Director of the Institute for the Study of Teaching and Learning in the Disciplines, Simon Fraser University
Laura D'Amico, Research Associate, Institute for the Study of Teaching and Learning in the Disciplines, Simon Fraser University
Tara McFarlane, Administrative Co-ordinator, Institute for the Study of Teaching and Learning in the Disciplines, Simon Fraser University 

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Amundsen

Cheryl Amundsen

Professor, Faculty of Education; Director of the Institute for the Study of Teaching and Learning in the Disciplines, Simon Fraser University
Ask me about scholarship of teaching and learning.
LD

Laura D'Amico

Research Associate, Institute for the Study of Teaching and Learning in the Disciplines, Simon Fraser University
avatar for Tara McFarlane

Tara McFarlane

Administrative Co-ordinator, Institute for the Study of Teaching and Learning in the Disciplines, Simon Fraser University
SFU


Monday June 6, 2016 1:00pm - 1:50pm PDT
Grand Villa 3 Ballroom (Second Floor)

1:00pm PDT

Teaching and Learning in a Biosphere: Curriculum Connections, Research and Student Engagement (1:00 - 2:15)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 60 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

Established in 2014 at Vancouver Island University, the Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Region Research Institute (MABRRI) is the engine behind the (Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Reserve) MABR’s research and educational programs. MABRRI’s mission is to advance a program of inquiry that involves regional stakeholders in meaningful explorations of issues of local relevance.

By harnessing the knowledge of the MABR community and the interdisciplinary strengths of students and faculty at Vancouver Island University, MABRRI is a centre for collaborative research, innovation, and knowledge sharing that elevates the relationship between people and nature in the biosphere region. The focus is on practical, applied research that benefits local communities and provides students with an opportunity to gain hands-on experience in research and dissemination.

MABRRI's research coordinator, VIU students, and faculty associates work with community partners to create and conduct research projects that advance our understanding of people and nature--and the interaction between these--within the Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Region. 

This session will highlight our current research program and activities, including our first-ever BioBlitz, Digital Storytelling Project, Interpretive Signage and Sense of Place Directed Study, Community Build-outs, the installation of a weather station and snow pillow on Mount Arrowsmith, and our lake and eelgrass monitoring program.  The session will also invite participants to identify opportunities at their own institutions, encouraging sharing on best practices and lessons learned.  


Presenters
Pam Shaw, Director, Master of Community Planning Program, Faculty of Social Sciences, Vancouver Island University and Research Director of the Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Region Research Institute (MABRRI)

Sarah Lumley, BA Research Coordinator at the Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Region Research Institute (MABRRI) and soon to be attending graduate school at Queens University. 


Speakers
avatar for Pamela Shaw

Pamela Shaw

Director, Master of Community Planning Program and 3M Teaching Fellow, Vancouver Island University
Pamela Shaw PhD MCIP RPP FRCGS is a 2018 3M Teaching Fellow, Geography Professor, Director of the Master of Community Planning Program, Research Director of the UNESCO Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Research Institute, Senior Editor of the International Journal of UNESCO Biosphere Reserves... Read More →


Monday June 6, 2016 1:00pm - 2:15pm PDT
Grand Villa 1 Ballroom (Second Floor)

2:00pm PDT

Lessons Learned: Using Project Based Learning Pedagogy in a Multi-Access Course (BUSN-3110) (2:00 - 2:30 Area 3A)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited 50 Participants (First-Come, First-In). This session happens in a large ballroom with two sessions at opposite ends of the room (Area 3A)

Research supports the value of interdisciplinary programs, however, there are relatively few interdisciplinary courses at the undergraduate level at the JIBC. The purpose of this study is to share successes and challenges from applying project based learning (PBL) in a multi-access inter-disciplinary course.

PBL is a comprehensive approach to teaching and learning that is designed to engage students in the investigation of authentic problems. Learning experiences are designed to enable students reach higher cognitive levels of problem solving and evaluation, while at the same time improving professional skills such as critical thinking, teamwork and communication.

Multi-access learning is “…a framework for enabling students in both face-to-face and online contexts to personalize learning experiences while engaging as a part of the same course.” (Irvine, Code, & Richards 2013).

The goals of this study are to:
  • Improve students’ learning by incorporating feedback provided by students, faculty and sponsors (community partners)
  • Document lessons learned for future adaptation by other faculty

Presenter
Florence Daddey, Program Manager, Justice Institute of British Columbia

Speakers
avatar for Florence Daddey

Florence Daddey

Centre for Teaching, Learning and Innovation, Justice Institute of BC
Florence is a Program Manager and Instructor and works for the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Innovation (CTLI) at the Justice Institute of BC. In her role as an instructional designer she collaborates with program areas and divisions as they develop and redesign their courses... Read More →


Monday June 6, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm PDT
Grand Villa 3 Ballroom (Second Floor)

2:00pm PDT

The Canada-Ghana Global Community Service Learning Project: Teaching and Learning through Sharing and Praxis (2:00 - 2:30 Area 3B)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 50 Participants (First-Come, First-In). This session is held in a large ballroom with two sessions happening at opposite ends of the room. (Area 3B)

Through a slideshow, I intend to show how I endeavor to inculcate in my students the culture of global citizenship by training them to become future leaders and citizens who think and act as global citizens and who are equipped with the requisite skillset, mindset, heartset, and values of global citizenship and committed to stewarding our planet responsibly to meet the needs of the current generation without compromising those of future ones. I do this through by engaging my students in research activities and pedagogy, including my research projects, the Classroom without Walls Web-conferencing Course on Globalization and Global Justice, the Aklowa (Village) Solar Lanterns, the Kwame Nkrumah International Conference series and the Ghana Field School.


Presenters
Charles Quist-Adade, Faculty Member, Sociology, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Nicholas Naresh, Student, Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Speakers
NN

Nicholas Naresh

Kwantlen Polytechnic University
KPU
CQ

Charles Quist-Adade

Faculty Member, Sociology, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
KPU


Monday June 6, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm PDT
Grand Villa 3 Ballroom (Second Floor)

2:45pm PDT

Assessing Team Process in Student Learning Teams: Recent Research from Royal Roads University (2:45 - 4:45)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 60 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

Through literature, Royal Roads University (RRU) has identified “a positive link between team learning and team performance” (Royal Roads University, 2013a, p. 24). Employers globally seek individuals who have demonstrated skills in collaboration, team facilitation, project management, conflict management, and relationship building to navigate the culturally diverse and complex world we live in.

Committed to building these competencies in students, team-based learning has been established as an educational pillar in our Learning and Teaching Model. RRU recently opened the Counselling and Coaching Center (CCC) to provide guidance, facilitation, instructor and instructional design collaboration around team assignments, investigation of effective teamwork assessment tools, and support to students learning teams. 

Join Trish Dyck and Sarah Chettleburgh, Team Coaches at the CCC at RRU and current Co-researchers as they share recent findings on research around best practices for team process assessment, guide you through a team based assessment activity used with RRU student learning teams, and participate in a facilitated dialogue to capture the collective wisdom of workshop participants regarding student learning teams.


Presenters 
Trish Dyck, Team Coach, Royal Roads University
Sarah Chettleburgh, Manager of Coaching Center, Royal Roads University 

Speakers
SC

Sarah Chettleburgh

Manager of Coaching Center, Royal Roads University
RRU
avatar for Trish Dyck

Trish Dyck

Manager of Team Coaching, Team Coach, Royal Roads University
Manager of Team Coaching at Royal Roads University (RRU). Team Coaching is a co-curricular support service at RRU offering team skill development, co-creation with instructors around team design/assessment, live team coaching, and mediation. I invite conversations on Team Based Learning... Read More →


Monday June 6, 2016 2:45pm - 4:45pm PDT
Grand Villa 1 Ballroom (Second Floor)

3:00pm PDT

Applying Inquiry-Based Learning in Your Classroom (3:00 - 3:50)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 50 Participants (First-Come, First-In). This session is held in a large ballroom with two sessions happening at the same time but at opposite ends of the room.

To prepare students for a world that is full of ill-defined dilemmas it is important to teach the tools and skills to think beyond the classroom. To help our students think critically it has been said we need to promote critical thinking, yet how is this done? What strategies are available for instructors to use? 

Promoting critical thinking is not just explaining to students how to ask better questions, or become better problem solvers. Critical thinking requires presenting material by looking at the merits and shortcomings of an issue to arrive at a reasoned judgment. In order for instructors to facilitate critical thinking they must also approach their teaching practice differently.

In this presentation a specific delivery approach which is drawn from the Critical Thinking Consortium C2T2.

Presenter
Cathy Griffin, Instructional Development Consultant, Learning and Teaching Centre, British Columbia Institute of Technology

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Griffin

Cathy Griffin

Instructional Development Consultant, Learning and Teaching Centre, British Columbia Institute of Technology
BCIT


Monday June 6, 2016 3:00pm - 3:50pm PDT
Grand Villa 3 Ballroom (Second Floor)

4:00pm PDT

International Students - Meeting the Challenge (4:00 - 4:50)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 50 Participants (First-Come, First-In). This session is held in a large ballroom with two sessions happening at the same time but at opposite ends of the room.

As post-secondary institutions accept greater numbers of international students, instructors are faced with myriad concomitant challenges. Now Mary-Anne Neal shares strategies for engaging international learners and maximizing their contribution to the classroom and online learning environments. In Canada, Mary-Anne has taught undergraduate learners from 17 countries; in China, she has taught courses for the B.A. in Tourism and the M.A. in Educational Leadership. Her approach incorporates core components of RRU's Learning and Teaching Model, with a focus on collaborative, experiential and authentic learning.  Participants will leave with practical strategies for student engagement that can be applied for online and face-to-face teaching.

Presenter
Mary-Anne Neal, Associate Faculty, Royal Roads University 

Speakers
avatar for Mary-Anne Neal

Mary-Anne Neal

Associate Faculty, Royal Roads University
I work to improve educational outcomes for indigenous learners who live in remote northern communities.My specialization is experiential learning and I want to learn more about incorporating activities into online instruction.



Monday June 6, 2016 4:00pm - 4:50pm PDT
Grand Villa 3 Ballroom (Second Floor)
 
Wednesday, June 8
 

10:45am PDT

Team and Community Building Online: Using Technologies from Industry to Enhance the Student Experience (10:45 - 12:00)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Open Session Limited to 20 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

Whether it is through policy and new curriculum in K-12 (BC Plan), or by revisiting the role and purpose of higher education at the post-secondary level (NMC Horizon Report, 2015), the current K-20 education environment in British Columbia is moving towards personalization, flexibility and mobility at a rapid rate.

The need for access to courses and programs that reflect the competencies valued the digital age and model inquiry based, experiential and authentic learning is central to the Royal Roads University Learning and Teaching model (Royal Roads University, 2013). 

As with other programs at Royal Roads University, in each of the courses in the MA Learning and Technology program, students are working in teams on a variety of authentic activities. Program assessment tasks are focused on process rather than content and active student engagement in these teams is essential to the learning process.

Taking a mixed-method approach, we explored the experiences of Masters-level students in a community building/onboarding module. Using the student experience as a foundation for the discussion, this interactive presentation will highlight preliminary findings of the role of online collaborative tools in fostering engagement in team activities and showcase the analysis of collaborative tools used in this research.

After taking part in this session, it expected that the audience will be better able to: understand the experiences of students who have taken part in online teamwork; appreciate how to select appropriate tools for students working in virtual teams; reflect more fully on the impact of online tools in team-based environments.


Presenters
Jo Axe, Director, School of Education & Technology, Royal Roads University
Elizabeth Childs, Associate Professor and Program Head, MALAT, School of Education and Technology, Royal Roads University
Darrell Pettyjohn, Manager, Learning Technologies, Centre for teaching and Educational Technologies, Royal Roads University  


Speakers
avatar for Jo Axe

Jo Axe

Professor, School of Education and Technology, Royal Roads University
Royal Roads University
avatar for Elizabeth Childs

Elizabeth Childs

Professor & Program Head, Royal Roads University (RRU)
At RRU we are designing a Masters program with openness, networked learning and digital mindset as core design principles.
avatar for Darrell Pettyjohn

Darrell Pettyjohn

Manager, Learning Technologies, Royal Roads University
Royal Roads University


Wednesday June 8, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm PDT
Maranello Conference Room (Third Floor)
 
Thursday, June 9
 

9:00am PDT

Degrees of Well-being: Research and Practice in Learning Environments at SFU (9:00 - 9:50)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 80 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

 Positive well-being is a key predictor for learning, yet this is rarely addressed in learning environments in higher education. Health Promotion and the Teaching and Learning Centre at SFU have developed an innovative project to work with faculty members in creating conditions for well-being within the learning environment.  These include flexibility, inclusivity and real-life learning as well as an overall positive classroom culture, among others.  

This session will increase understanding about how the post-secondary learning environment impacts well-being as demonstrated in SFU’s participatory action research study involving 14 faculty members. 

The session will also provide examples and tools for educators to intentionally consider well-being within their teaching practice whether it be through course design, course delivery or student assessment.  

Participants will be invited to share their own experiences that relate to the conditions for well-being, and contribute to furthering knowledge exchange and practice in this area.

Presenters
Rosie Dhaliwal, Health Promotion Specialist, Simon Fraser University
Alisa Stanton, Health Promotion Specialist, Simon Fraser University
David Zandvliet, Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University
Barbara Berry, Educational Consultant, Teaching and Learning Centre, Simon Fraser University

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Berry

Barbara Berry

Educational Consultant, Teaching and Learning Centre, Simon Fraser University
I am an Educational Consultant at SFU and I support faculty in the design of their courses, curricula and programs in the Faculty of Health Sciences and the School of Interactive Arts and Technology. I have experience in community health promotion, community/organizational change... Read More →
RD

Rosie Dhaliwal

Health Promotion Specialist, Simon Fraser University
Rosie Dhaliwal, MEd, RD, is a Diversity & Inclusion and Education Specialist in Human Resources at Simon Fraser University (SFU). She has diverse experiences in nutrition and dietetics including roles as a Clinical Dietitian and Nutrition Consultant in the community, Distance Education... Read More →
AS

Alisa Stanton

Health Promotion Specialist, Simon Fraser University
SFU
DZ

David Zandvliet

Associate Professor, SFU Faculty of Education
SFU


Thursday June 9, 2016 9:00am - 9:50am PDT
Grand Villa 2 Ballroom (Second Floor)

9:00am PDT

Surfing the Ebbs and Flows as Educational Developers Embedded in a Faculty (9:00 - 9:50)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 40 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

Using the lens of organizational socialization theories (Kramer, 2010), Judy Chan (UBC) and Sarah Louise Turner (SFU) will introduce the diverse organizational structures and goals of educational developers embedded in a Faculty. Over the past five years, both UBC and SFU teaching and learning support units have been exploring an embedded model. Though all liaisons serve similar goals in fostering and supporting quality teaching and learning, flexibility surfaces as the most salient commonality.  

Through discussion and observation of a role-play, participants of this session will gain an overview of this complex system. Colleagues interested in this model will hear about several strategies to help them clarify expected roles. Colleagues who are considering this model will gain some insight on how to engage this conversation with their Faculty.  

The session will end with a reflection on the importance of relationships during institutional shifts.

Presenters
Judy Chan, Faculty Liaison, University of British Columbia
Sarah Louise Turner, Educational Consultant, Learning and Teaching Centre, Simon Fraser University


Speakers
avatar for Judy Chan

Judy Chan

Education Consultant, Faculty Liaison, University of British Columbia
UBC
avatar for Sarah Louise Turner

Sarah Louise Turner

Educational Consultant, Learning and Teaching Centre, Simon Fraser University
SFU


Thursday June 9, 2016 9:00am - 9:50am PDT
Veranda + Portico Conference Rooms (Combined - Third Floor)

9:00am PDT

Turning Backpacks to Briefcases: Career Experiential Education in the Classroom (9:00 - 9:50)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 20 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

Typically, when one thinks of co-operative education (co-op) programs in post-secondary institutions, processes such as placing students in temporary roles and liaising with employers come to mind. Yet, there is more than meets the eye, as the educational components of teaching and learning in co-op programs is rarely mentioned.

This interactive session showcases an experiential activity facilitated in Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s COOP 1101, a one-credit foundational course students take prior to entering the co-op program.

The activity requires students to adopt an employer perspective, form a selection committee, rank a series of sample applications, and justify their candidate decisions. Through self-reflection, collaboration with fellow classmates, and a comprehensive class debrief, students gain insights to improve their own applications, while the activity serves as a primer for consequent modules and activities.

Evidently, the six categories of Fink’s taxonomy (foundational knowledge, application, integration, human dimension, caring, and learning to learn) are realized.

Presenter
Candy Ho, Instructor, Co-operative Education, Kwantlen Polytechnic University 

Speakers
avatar for Candy Ho

Candy Ho

Faculty, Educational Studies, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Candy Ho teaches at Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s Educational Studies department in the Faculty of Arts. She is keen to explore the convergence between career education and development, teaching and learning, and student success.


Thursday June 9, 2016 9:00am - 9:50am PDT
Venezia Conference Room (Second Floor)

10:00am PDT

Critical, Creative & Collaborative Inquiry: Observations on Educational Engagement (10:00 - 10:30)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 40 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

The presentation will reflect on the implications for educational engagement and the strengths and challenges of implementing critical, creative and collaborative inquiry within the context of horticulture education at KPU. Application of an inquiry approach has demonstrated that critical thinking nurtures learner engagement and promotes deeper understanding of curriculum for transfer of learning.

Presenter
Michelle Nakano, Faculty, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
 

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Nakano

Michelle Nakano

Faculty, Science & Horticulture, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Michelle is a career educator whose priority is student engagement in experiential learning and open education. 


Thursday June 9, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am PDT
Veranda + Portico Conference Rooms (Combined - Third Floor)

10:00am PDT

Longitudinal Analysis of Peer Feedback in a Writing-Intensive Course: a Pilot Study (10:00 - 10:30)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 80 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

Numerous studies have shown that peer feedback can improve writing. Most, however, focus on improvements on drafts of the same essay, and few consider more than one or two sessions of peer feedback. In a pilot study we considered the impact of peer feedback given and received on improvements in essay quality across ten different essays written by twelve students, all of which received peer feedback. In this small sample we did not find evidence that peer feedback was associated with improvements in essay quality, nor that this relationship changed over time, though we did see a strong relationship between comments received on one essay and those received on later ones. Participants will leave the session with a model for coding feedback comments and evaluating the impact of giving and receiving peer feedback on writing, and during the session will evaluate strengths and weaknesses of our research design and suggest improvements. 

Presenter
Christina Hendricks, Senior Instructor, Philosophy and Arts One, University of British Columbia

Speakers
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching in Philosophy, Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver
Philosophy, OER, open textbooks, open pedagogy, accessibility



Thursday June 9, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am PDT
Grand Villa 2 Ballroom (Second Floor)

10:00am PDT

Mini Papers for Applied Learning (10:00 - 10:30)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 20 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

Based on ideas offered by Bean (2011), I use ‘Mini Papers’ to help my Sociology of Sport undergraduate students consolidate their thinking on our major topics (class, race, gender, sexuality, deviance). Instead of traditional essays where the intended audience is limited to the instructor/ professor, these mini papers task students to direct their writing to a variety of audiences. Students are asked to write short responses to school principals, family members, newspapers, community sport organizations and so on. As such, the organization of their ideas through critical thinking is challenged and developed. Students report heightened engagement with the material, and their understanding (theoretical and applied) is deepened. 

Presenter
Lauren Couture, Assistant Professor, University of the Fraser Valley

Speakers
LC

Lauren Couture

Assistant Professor, University of the Fraser Valley
UFV


Thursday June 9, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am PDT
Venezia Conference Room (Second Floor)

10:50am PDT

Benefits of Collaborative Learning Design for Online, Blended, and Face-to-Face Delivery (10:50-11:20)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 80 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

The Centre for Teaching and Educational Technologies at Royal Roads University is commencing a collaborative design approach that promotes a team-based model for program and course design and development. The new approach includes four distinct design and development phases implemented by the learning design team; a faculty member, learning designer, senior learning technologist, copyright expert, librarian, program head, and program staff. What are the benefits of collaborative learning design? Come find out.   

Presenter
Sophia Palahicky, Manager, Learning Design Services, Centre for Teaching and Educational Technologies (CTET), Royal Roads University 

Speakers
avatar for Sophia Palahicky

Sophia Palahicky

Associate Director, Centre for Teaching and Educational Technologies, Royal Roads University
Sophia holds a leadership role in CTET. She and her team of learning designers work with core and associate faculty to design and develop courses that promote social constructivist learning, team based learning, and collaborative learning as prescribed by the learning and teaching... Read More →


Thursday June 9, 2016 10:50am - 11:20am PDT
Grand Villa 2 Ballroom (Second Floor)

10:50am PDT

Engaging Students’ through Experiential Learning in my Web Design Programming (10:50 - 11:20)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 40 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

Having students involved with such service-learning web projects activities parallel my teaching philosophy as “you have to be able to practice what you teach”. This session will describe the community outreach service-learning web projects where I have collaborated and coordinated with several local, regional and international non-profit organizations and small businesses to connect students in my Web Design I Programming class with an actual business client as a requirement of the final project. These outreach activities allowed my students to either create and/or modify a web site. My students learn to practice problem-solving, and critical thinking techniques for lifelong learning skills during the process of completing the service-learning web project with clients. This experience has become a win-win for the organizations involved, Thompson Rivers University (TRU), TRU Computing Science (CS) department and more importantly students in my classes since 2003.

Presenter
Mohd Abdullah, Senior Lecturer, Thompson Rivers University 

Speakers
avatar for Mohd A

Mohd A

OLFM, Thompson Rivers University


Thursday June 9, 2016 10:50am - 11:20am PDT
Veranda + Portico Conference Rooms (Combined - Third Floor)

10:50am PDT

Fail Better: Teaching Students How to Fail to Succeed (10:50 - 11:20)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Open Session Limited to 20 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

As Halpern and Hakel pointed out back in 2002: “It is sadly true that most of the way we teach and learn is uninformed by laboratory findings in human cognition” (p. 1). Research, especially over the past twenty years, has taught us a lot about how people learn and about how we can improve our students’ learning by adopting practices that apply the principles of the science of learning. In this session, we’ll look at the role failure plays in learning and how we can build desirable difficulties into our class activities to help students engage brain processes that support long-term retention. Participants will have the opportunity to explores ways to practically apply the principles in their teaching and learning.

Presenters
Sarah Bowers, Chair, Educational Technology and Curriculum Consultant Teaching and Curriculum Development Centre, Langara College
Julia Denholm, Dean Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Sunshine Coast, Capilano University


Speakers
avatar for Sarah Bowers

Sarah Bowers

Chair, Educational Technology, Langara College
Langara
avatar for Julia Denholm

Julia Denholm

Dean, Faculty of Arts and Sciences and kalax-ay | Sunshine Coast Campus, Capilano University
Please talk to me about productive failure, curriculum development and review, program review and assessment, writing strong learning outcomes, or anything to do with academic leadership and administration.



Thursday June 9, 2016 10:50am - 11:20am PDT
Venezia Conference Room (Second Floor)

11:30am PDT

Graduate Teams as Change Agents (11:30 - 12:00)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 40 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

This session explores the design of courses that connect graduate students with clients for challenging, authentic, real world learning. The session will include brief presentations and dialogues in which participants explore questions, challenges and expertise about this design approach.

The presenter is currently working with a research team to explore such courses at Royal Roads University. This research focuses specifically on courses with graduate students who work in teams to help clients with their current problems, challenges or opportunities.  In some of the courses, students and their clients were in different cities, provinces or countries.  Student, faculty and client experiences are explored in the study.  

The presenter is currently working with a research team with Amy Zidulka and BJ Eib to explore such courses at Royal Roads University. 


Participants in this session will go away with some findings from the study and with ideas from peers for customized implementation.

Presenters
Alice MacGillivray, Associate Faculty, Royal Roads University 
BJ Eib, Faculty Development Liaison, Centre for Teaching and Educational Technologies (CTET), Royal Roads University
Amy Zidulka, Assistant Professor, School of Business, Royal Roads University

Speakers
avatar for Alice MacGillivray

Alice MacGillivray

Alice MacGillivray, Consultant and Associate Faculty Member, Royal Roads University
I am an independent consultant and faculty member, based on Gabriola Island in B.C. Some of my most durable interests include leadership, formal and informal learning, and work in complex systems. Much of my work is informed by principles from natural systems. I have designed several... Read More →


Thursday June 9, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm PDT
Veranda + Portico Conference Rooms (Combined - Third Floor)

11:30am PDT

How Flexible is Flexible Learning? (11:30 - 12:00)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 80 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

Changes in the way students use technology in their daily lives has caused a dramatic shift in how, when and where they learn (Collis and Moonin, 2011). This flexibility offers the potential for educators to explore new ways of reaching students and leveraging valuable experiential learning opportunities (Salmon, 2011).

However, there is a lack of evidence-based research that investigates whether or not students are taking advantage of this flexibility, or if it is benefiting them in the ways educators assume (Edwards and Clark, 2002).

In this session, we will present data from learning analytics, student surveys and tracked IP addresses for twenty-five assignments from three recently-converted ‘flexible’ courses to examine where and when students are learning in this environment. We will then facilitate a brief discussion with participants on their experiences with flexible learning and the impact on student learning.

Presenters
Derek Turner, Teaching and Learning Fellow (Flexible Learning), University of British Columbia
Loch Brown, Instructor, University of British Columbia
Arthur 'Gill' Green, Teaching and Learning Fellow (Flexible Learning), University of British Columbia
Miriam Katz, Student, University of British Columbia

Speakers
avatar for Loch Brown

Loch Brown

Instructor, University of British Columbia
I am passionate about pedagogical innovation and how we can leverage existing and emerging technologies to enhance learning in environmental and geographic education. I am also interested in examining, through a more critical lens, the underlying forces driving how and why educational... Read More →
avatar for Gill Green

Gill Green

Professor, Okanagan College
Property rights, war crimes, GIScience, & open pedagogy.
MK

Miriam Katz

Student, University of British Columbia
UBC
avatar for Derek Turner

Derek Turner

Teaching and Learning Fellow (Flexible Learning), University of British Columbia
UBC


Thursday June 9, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm PDT
Grand Villa 2 Ballroom (Second Floor)

11:30am PDT

International and English as an Additional Language Learners in Co-op: Innovating our Curriculum Delivery and Practice (11:30 - 12:00)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session for 20 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

The EAL student population at SFU is at approximately 41%. Many of these students seek domestic work placements through programs such as Co-operative Education. Language and culture have been shown, in the literature and through the research for this project, to be a barrier to EAL student success.

Staff within Co-op are not typically trained or educated in teaching language and culture. As a result, EAL and CAC students were often displaced to various units, programs or specialty services, none of which were specific to the work search and placement goals of Co-operative Education. 

This presentation will describe the development of an online, self-paced, visually-based course, Job Search Success, to assist EAL and Canada as an Additional Culture (CAC) co-op students better prepare their work search documents and for related intercultural communication activities. Sample curricular elements and initial pilot feedback will be shared.

Presenters
Heather Williams, Online Learning Facilitator, Simon Fraser University
Nancy Johnston, Executive Director, Student Affairs, Simon Fraser University 

Speakers
NJ

Nancy Johnston

Executive Director, Student Affairs, Simon Fraser University
SFU
avatar for Heather Williams

Heather Williams

Special Projects: Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, Office of the Vice Provost, Students and International, Simon Fraser University
Heather Williams is currently on secondment with the Office of the Vice Provost Students and International to help develop a strategic plan on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion for students at Simon Fraser University. Previously Heather has worked as the Language and Culture Curriculum... Read More →


Thursday June 9, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm PDT
Venezia Conference Room (Second Floor)

1:00pm PDT

Flipped Learning: Requires Strategic Planning and Execution (1:00 - 1:50)
Limited Capacity filling up

Open Session Limited to 20 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

Higher education instructional methods are entering into an unprecedented time of change where after centuries information transmission or lecture style teaching methods are being questioned and new ways of teaching are being suggested (e.g., Fink, 2013; Lakkala, Toom, Ilomaki & Muukkkonen, 2015; Keeling & Hersh, 2012).

This study investigated the effectiveness of a flipped classroom model from both the instructors' and the students' perspectives in the context of university Communications courses. While merits of the flipped model were found, this research also found that both student and faculty preparedness are significant factors in determining its success.

The flipped model requires strategic planning, and execution. In many ways if requires faculty to flip their practice.

Presenters
Linda Pardy, Ed. D., Associate Professor, University of the Fraser Valley
Samantha Pattridge, Department Head, Associate Professor, University of the Fraser Valley 

Speakers
avatar for Linda Pardy

Linda Pardy

Associate Professor, University of the Fraser Valley
Knowledge Practice and Experiential Learning Innovations in Teaching. Expanding Career Options for Arts Majors. Indigenization: Faculty development for non-Indigenous instructors. Teaching and Learning: Faculty Involvement in Student Development Storytelling: Alternative Notions for... Read More →
avatar for Samantha Pattridge

Samantha Pattridge

Department Head, Associate Professor, University of the Fraser Valley
UFV


Thursday June 9, 2016 1:00pm - 1:50pm PDT
Carrera Conference Room (Third Floor)

1:00pm PDT

Peer Evaluation as a Learning & Assessment Strategy: Enhancing Student Engagement in Online Group Projects (1:00 - 1:50)
Limited Capacity filling up

Open Session Limited to 20 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

This interactive session focuses on two key issues: 
• How does peer evaluation strategy bridge learning and assessment in online learning/teaching?
• What is the influence of disciplinary drivers in using peer evaluation?

The case study which is central to this session is a story of peer evaluation implementation in a graduate business administration program offered online. Points of interest include course curriculum features, technology tools and the framing of peer evaluation in the overall assessment design in courses. The questions that the participants bring to this session will both frame this story and lead to further discussions.

Participants open the session with a brief account of their experience or questions in using peer evaluation in their teaching/course design. This generates focal questions for discussion during the session. Followed by the case study presentation, participants address these questions from their respective disciplinary, teaching and curricular contexts.

Presenter
Ranga Venkatachary, Program Director, Centre for Online and Distance Education, Simon Fraser University


Speakers
RV

Ranga Venkatachary

Program Director, Centre for Online and Distance Education, Simon Fraser University
SFU


Thursday June 9, 2016 1:00pm - 1:50pm PDT
Maranello Conference Room (Third Floor)

2:00pm PDT

From Brynania to Business: Designing an Evidence-Based Educational Simulation From an Exploration of a Real Time Blended Model (2:00 - 2:30)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 20 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

This study provided an opportunity to look across disciplines and beyond regular roleplaying and standard digital-based business games to a successful, long running unique blended simulation in a different yet related field. The lessons learned from the “anywhere anytime” simulation design of a capstone project for undergraduates in a Political Science course at McGill University provide guidance for the design of a similar simulation model for use in undergraduate business courses at Capilano University in North Vancouver. 

The results of the data collected through surveys, focus groups, interviews and field observations of the simulation which was conducted from 9 a.m to 9 p.m. each day through emails, social media and face to face informal and formal meetings (in the midst of the rest of "regular life") suggest that students are highly engaged and productive.

A community was created during the week and the instructor involvement and modelling influenced the outcomes.  Some gender differences in expectations and engagement were found. Sixteen design principles were distilled from the study for use in a future role play simulation.

Presenter
Nancy Nowlan, Faculty, Capilano University 

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Nowlan

Nancy Nowlan

Faculty, Capilano University
I'm a long time business instructor at Capilano University and a very old doctoral student in Education at SFU! Finishing my research into simulations and looking forward to sharing with others.


Thursday June 9, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm PDT
Maranello Conference Room (Third Floor)

2:00pm PDT

Inclusion at Post-Secondary: Emerging Themes and Ideas (2:00 - 2:30)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 20 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

For almost 15 years the BC Initiative for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education (IPSE) has been working in collaboration with Universities and Colleges to include adults with intellectual disabilities in the regular academic and social life of campus. Admission to post secondary is based on the individual student’s desire to study and not on any minimum academic requirements.  

This approach to post-secondary education has emerged as a “practical and moral imperative” to addressing the marginalization of people with intellectual disabilities and has been recognized internationally as a best practice.  

At the same time, this movement for inclusion has raised questions about the role of post-secondary education in Canadian society and has challenged assumptions about who belongs at post-secondary.  

In this session we will introduce participants to the BC Initiative for IPSE and discuss how this movement for inclusion is revealing new ideas about teaching and learning at post-secondary campuses across BC.

Presenters
Arden Duncan Bonokoski, Provincial Co-ordinator, BC Initiative for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education
Charles Bingham, Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University

Speakers
CB

Charles Bingham

Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University
SFU
AD

Arden Duncan Bonokoski

Executive Director, BC Initiative for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education


Thursday June 9, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm PDT
Carrera Conference Room (Third Floor)

2:45pm PDT

Animating Critical Scholarship in a Large Class and Assessment Challenges (2:45 - 3:15)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open Session Limited to 20 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

Research shows that active, social, engaging and student-owned learning experiences promote higher level critical thinking skills and leads to meaningful learning. This is challenging in large classes of fifty or more students. They are used to a system where they have little input in experientially building their critical scholarship skills. They expect to be assessed through lengthy hourly exams consisting of multiple choice questions, fill-in the blanks and short paragraph essays.

In a move to integrate assessment practices with students’ engagement in critical thinking and course content, the instructor, together with an educational consultant from SFU’s Teaching Learning Centre planned an assignment that was team-based with interactive verbal analytical skills and ‘thinking on the spot’.

The research questions are:

• What are the ways students can be individually assessed in a team-based activity, taking into account the expectations of an especially diverse student population?

• How do we ensure that these assessments are multidimensional, capturing inventive thinking while minimizing students’ self conscious efforts?

Our presentation approach is exploratory. Participants are invited to partake in a sample exercise.

Presenters
Nur Intan Murtadza, Sessional Instructor and Research Assistant for the Teaching and Learning Centre, Simon Fraser University
Sarah Louise Turner, Educational Consultant, Learning and Teaching Centre, Simon Fraser University

 

Speakers
NI

Nur Intan Murtadza

Sessional Instructor and Research Assistant for the Teaching and Learning Centre, Simon Fraser University
SFU
avatar for Sarah Louise Turner

Sarah Louise Turner

Educational Consultant, Learning and Teaching Centre, Simon Fraser University
SFU


Thursday June 9, 2016 2:45pm - 3:15pm PDT
Maranello Conference Room (Third Floor)

2:45pm PDT

Engagement is Not Enough: Developing Students' Capability for Teamwork (2:45 - 3:15)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Open Session Limited to 20 Participants (First-Come, First-In)

Employers, higher education stakeholders and professional bodies agree: students require strong teamwork capability to achieve complex project goals. Just providing teamwork opportunities does not ensure success ‒ often students develop negative attitudes towards teamwork (Gale et al., 2014) and report inadequate teamwork instruction (Webb & Miller, 2006). 

Our study reviewed current research evidence on teamwork capability through a content analysis structure adapted from the Assuring Graduate Capabilities model (Oliver, 2015). This analysis highlighted the value of formal teamwork instruction for students to develop knowledge, tools for documentation and reflection to build skills and explicit attention to student attitudes about teamwork and to development of this capability. 

Presenter
Paola Gavilanez, Faculty of Interior Design, Kwantlen Polytechnic University  

Speakers
avatar for Paola Gavilanez

Paola Gavilanez

Faculty, Interior Design, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
interior design | teamwork | sustainability | interdisciplinary studies



Thursday June 9, 2016 2:45pm - 3:15pm PDT
Carrera Conference Room (Third Floor)

3:30pm PDT

What ‘Counts’ as Research or Scholarship? The (Un)Intentional Narrowing of the Definition of 'Scholarship' in SoTL (3:30 - 4:00)
Limited Capacity filling up

Open Session Limited to 20 Participants (First-Come, First In)

Does your original discipline have 'A' Journals and 'B' Journals? Do you know colleagues who have submitted scholarly work to an 'A' Journal, had it rejected, and then successfully published it in a 'B' Journal? As a community, have we squandered our opportunity to define 'scholarship' more broadly in our rush to legitimize the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)?

During this discussion, I will offer two broader definitions of scholarship and research that, if properly embraced, would mean that we are more inclusive of activities that would count on a CV or in a Dossier.

From our combined experiences, we will generate examples of scholarly activities that should legitimately ‘count’, but are often dismissed by narrow definitions. I will argue that we need to take every opportunity to stretch the boundaries of our practice and educate others about our scholarly work, or we risk being seen as doing ‘silo’ work with little relevance to the broader education enterprise.

Presenter
Russell Day, Teaching Professor, Simon Fraser University 

Speakers
RD

Russell Day

Teaching Professor, Simon Fraser University
Dr. Russell Day is a Teaching Professor in Psychology, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Simon Fraser University. In addition to teaching large Intro Psyc courses, he is involved in a variety of educational development activities, primarily with the Instructional Skills Workshop... Read More →


Thursday June 9, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm PDT
Maranello Conference Room (Third Floor)